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Center for Health Sciences
Course Descriptions
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First Year, Fall Semester
microscopesGross and Developmental Anatomy
A course designed to introduce the student to the general and specific concepts of regional morphology through didactic presentations and laboratory dissections. Emphasis is centered on the range of normal for the various organ systems and their interrelationships. These learning opportunities allow the student to apply anatomical knowledge in clinical situations later on.

Histology
Histology is designed to familiarize the student with normal microscopic tissue architecture. Lecture and laboratories will serve as the format of presentation for the histologic concepts of the basic tissues and organ systems. The course will be the basis for future understanding of pathological and physiological principles.

Medical Biochemistry
Provides a broad survey of the chemical classes and metabolic processes that are consistent with the normal functions of biosystems. Special attention is given to the functions and interrelationships of these processes in human metabolism to provide a foundation for understanding the chemistry of disease states when discussed in the second-year program.

Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine I
This course introduces the importance of the musculoskeletal system in health and disease. The course consists of both lecture and hands-on practicum sessions. Lectures provide the didactic base for the practical sessions while the development of palpatory skills for diagnosis and treatment are stressed in the practicums. Students are introduced to the osteopathic structural exam and a variety of manual techniques that will serve as the building block for osteopathic manipulative skills which are used throughout a lifetime of practice. Students practicing on each other is an essential element of the practicum setting.

Diagnostic Imaging
In this course, students can learn normal human anatomy as it is depicted in routine clinical diagnostic imaging studies. The course introduces students to various imaging modalities and a regional anatomy approach is followed thorught he course. Basic image technique and positioning and various image modalities used in diagnostic imaging will be discussed.

Special Studies
In addition to the standard curriculum, medical students have the opportunity to participate in graduate courses and research projects. Enrollment in these courses and projects for credit may be completed in the Office of Student Affairs. Completion of these courses and projects will be posted on the student’s official transcript with satisfactory/unsatisfactory credit.

First Year, Spring Semester
Neuroanatomy
This course encompasses the study of structure and integrative function of the central nervous system. Lectures and laboratory demonstrations emphasize the role of the brain and spinal cord in sensory perception and motor responses. Neuroanatomy presentations are offered to enhance the students’ understanding of the normal anatomy of the central nervous system.

Medical Physiology
This descriptive and quantitative study involves the integration of structure and function of the human body with a functional analysis of the organ systems. Emphasis is placed on comprehension of the physiologic principles and control mechanisms that maintain homeostasis. All systems of the body are discussed, and various interrelationships are analyzed. This course establishes the fundamental dynamic view of physiology upon which subsequent clinical learning is dependent. Problem-solving techniques are utilized to develop and examine student understanding.

Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine II
This course continues the student's training in basic psychomotor skills in osteopathic principles and practice. The practicum sessions include simulated clinical experiences in osteopathic principles and practice using small group experiences, case studies, and audio visual aids using fellow students. Lectures provide the didactic base for practicums. Hands-on sessions develop student evaluation and treatment skills using muscle energy and counterstrain techniques for examining and treating the musculoskeletal system.

Clinical Skills I
This course introduces the concepts of history taking and physical diagnosis skills. The practicum includes simulated clinical experiences through the use of small group discussion, case studies, audio visual aids using fellow students, and simulated patient models. This course exposes students to the principles of clinical work and serves as a building block for osteopathic clinical skills which are used throughout a lifetime of practice.

Medical Microbiology and Immunology
This course is designed to help the student observe and understand fundamental similarities and differences among pathogenic microorganisms. Laboratory exercises stress the basic serological and microbiological procedures used in the diagnosis of infectious diseases. The lectures emphasize characteristics, pathogenesis, and control of medically important microorganisms and disorders of the immune system.

Clinical Epidemiology
Introduces students to concepts of clinical epidemiology and evidence-based medicine. Students learn to apply these concepts to evaluate evidence used in medical decision-making or presented in medical research studies. Small group discussions provide opportunities to practice application of concepts and skills presented in lectures.

Special Studies
In addition to the standard curriculum, medical students have the opportunity to participate in graduate courses and research projects. Enrollment in these courses and projects for credit may be completed in the Office of Student Affairs. Completion of these courses and projects will be posted on the student’s official transcript with satisfactory/unsatisfactory credit.

Second Year, Fall Semester
General Pathology I
General pathology is a field of knowledge that explores the reaction of the body to diseases and the description and identification of basic disease processes in terms of morphology, physiology, and chemistry. Major processes such as cell injury, cell death, healing, neoplasia, inflammation, and diseases of development and aging are emphasized. A student who completes this course successfully will have knowledge of basic disease processes and the ability to recognize and describe basic disease processes from gross and microscopic specimens.

Clinical Problem Solving I
This course is a combination of several body systems modules. Each module will concentrate on a particular body system (e.g., cardiovascular system) and will be coordinated with the content of General Pathology. Each module is comprised of lectures containing clinical information relevant to that body system in addition to case-based problems that students will work to solve in a small group discussion format.

Pharmacology: Pharmacological Agents I
This course presents general principles of drug action, drugs acting on the autonomic nervous system, and drugs used in treating infectious diseases and cancer. Emphasis is placed on the mode of action, pharmacokinetics, physiologic effects, therapeutic indications, and adverse reactions to these drugs.

Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine III
This course continues the training in osteopathic manipulative medicine. It includes refinement of palpatory evaluation and diagnosis, and manipulative techniques. The osteopathic approach is emphasized in each presentation. The patient as a whole individual, not just a body system, is considered in context with the social and family unit. The effects of visceral elements on the somatic system, and vice versa, are explored, with emphasis on the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and cardiovascular systems. New manipulative models are introduced including high velocity / low amplitude, myofascial, and cranial osteopathic techniques. Review of previously learned materials is done in a multi-model approach as it applies to different systems and common diagnostic problems. Skills are presented and practiced through lectures and practicums, with students practicing on each other in most practicums. Professionalism appropriate to the osteopathic physician is demonstrated throughout the course.

Clinical Skills II
This course continues training in the psychomotor skills needed by the osteopathic physician. Course topics include laboratory and other diagnostic techniques. Students practice on each other and simulated patient models.

Health Promotion-Disease Prevention I
This course helps students develop the ability to plan, implement and evaluate a clinical practice-based program of health promotion and disease prevention. The course follows a life-span developmental framework and includes instruction in age-appropriate immunization, screening and counseling activities.

Multicultural Health
This course introduces students to issues related to practicing medicine in an increasingly diverse society. Students learn about diversity in health beliefs, behaviors, and outcomes. They also learn strategies to increase the likelihood of positive encounters with patients whose beliefs and behaviors are different from their own.

Psychiatry I
This course utilizes a biopsychosocial, evidence-based approach to teach effective strategies for recognition and management of psychiatric problems in the primary care medical setting.

Special Studies
In addition to the standard curriculum, medical students have the opportunity to participate in graduate courses and research projects. Enrollment in these courses and projects for credit may be completed in the Office of Student Affairs. Completion of these courses and projects will be posted on the student’s official transcript with satisfactory/unsatisfactory credit.

Second Year, Spring Semester
General Pathology II
Continuation of General Pathology I.

Clinical Problem Solving II
Continuation of Clinical Problem Solving I.

Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine IV
This course continues osteopathic manipulative medicine training needed by the primary care physician. This includes palpatory diagnosis and manipulative techniques. The integration of osteopathic manipulative management of different populations is stressed. Common problems such as scoliosis, fibromyalgia, and low back pain are covered.

Clinical Skills III
This course builds on the skills learned in Clinical Skills II. Further training in history taking, physical examination, and common clinical skills is presented. Students will learn to integrate osteopathic concepts into the management of different patient populations through lecture and practicum sessions. Small group discussions, case studies, and real and simulated patient models are used. This course prepares student for performing the clinical skills needed in clerkships in the third and fourth year.

Psychiatry II
Continuation of Psychiatry I.

Pharmacology: Pharmacological Agents II
Continuation of Pharmacology: Pharmacological Agents I.

Health Promotion-Disease Prevention II
Continuation of Health Promotion-Disease Prevention I.

Special Studies
In addition to the standard curriculum, medical students have the opportunity to participate in graduate courses and research projects. Enrollment in these courses and projects for credit may be completed in the Office of Student Affairs. Completion of these courses and projects will be posted on the student’s official transcript with satisfactory/unsatisfactory credit.

Advanced Cardiac Life Support
This ACLS provider course consists of a series of lectures derived from the Textbook for Advanced Cardiac Life Support, practical performance stations in which ACLS skills are taught, and stations for testing practical skills and cognitive knowledge of emergency cardiac care.

Third and Fourth Year
Medicine I and II
These clerkships take place in a College-affiliated facility and are designed to involve the student in the care of acutely ill general medicine patients. The student is assigned patients and under the supervision of the attending internal medicine physician and medicine resident staff, assists in their evaluation and care. Teaching conferences and rounds are conducted daily and assigned topics for reading are given and students are tested on the material.

Surgery
This clerkship takes place in a College-affiliated facility and is designed to involve the student in preoperative, operative, and postoperative care of general surgical patients. The student is assigned patient responsibility under the supervision of the attending surgeon and surgical resident staff. Basic principles of surgical technique are stressed at the operating table. Teaching conferences and rounds are held on a regular basis, and selected topics for reading and reporting may be assigned. Subspecialty surgical experiences are usually available. Outpatient surgical clinic allows evaluation of surgical problems in an office setting.

Obstetrics and Gynecology
This clerkship takes place in a College-affiliated facility and is designed to involve the student in: the management and delivery of the hospitalized obstetrical patient; diagnosis and management of gynecological disorders; and family planning. Patient assignments and supervision are directed by the attending obstetrical and/or gynecological physician and resident staff. Teaching rounds and conferences are held regularly, and selected reading and report topics may be assigned.

Family Medicine Clinic
This clerkship takes place at the College’s Health Care Center and is designed to encourage involvement of the third-year student in every aspect of family medicine. Full-time physician faculty supervise the students to prepare them for clerkships outside the college environment. One hour of morning didactics is followed by active participation in patient care. History taking, physical examination, proper laboratory and X-ray procedure, and long-term care are emphasized.

Community Clinic
This clerkship gives third-year students continued preparation for clerkship training in rural and community-based rotations. Students spend every Friday in didactics covering topics relating to rural health care, i.e., distance learning, lecture prep, community resources, telemedicine and interdisciplinary health care. Students spend the remainder of the week in a physician’s office in a small community surrounding Tulsa.

Rural Clinic
This clerkship gives third-year students direct involvement and experience in a functioning rural family practice under the direct supervision of a family physician. This clerkship offers a wide variety of clerical and office management experiences including exposure to the role of physicians in rural communities and their interrelationships with community health agencies. Trainees participate in weekly didactic sessions, a videoconference lecture and community-oriented activities. Out of office experiences such as hospital records, staff meetings, and emergency room calls are all an integral part of this program. Additionally, students prepare a paper on the use of rural resources utilizing an actual patient case.

Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine
The Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine (OMM) clerkship is designed to provide student with an opportunity to experience OMM in the clinical setting. Students will perform Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment under the supervision of a licensed osteopathic physician. The rotation is one month in length. Students spend one week in the hospital setting and three weeks in the ambulatory clinic.

Emergency Room
This clerkship takes place in an AOA-approved hospital or College-affiliated facility and is designed to familiarize the student with acute care and crises intervention of life-threatening medical, surgical, and psychiatric problems. Patient assignments are made by the director of emergency room services. Student supervision is under the direction of the emergency room director and attending staff.

Pediatrics
This clerkship takes place in one of a variety of settings designed to involve the student in the basic principles of pediatric diagnosis and therapeutics. The student may be assigned patients and assumes responsibility for them under the supervision of the attending pediatrician and, in some cases, pediatric resident staff. Teaching conferences and rounds are provided when available at the location and readings are assigned from a required text. Competency in certain skills must be demonstrated, and an examination is given over the reading assignment.

Community Hospital I and II
This two-month clerkship takes place in a community-based hospital which is designed to involve the fourth-year student in all areas of community hospital medical care as provided by primary care physicians. Trainees participate in academic sessions as well as review and post test from College-sponsored distance learning videos via the Web. Experiences may include emergency room, general medicine, OB/GYN, surgical care, and other subspecialties.

Psychiatry
This clerkship takes place in College-affiliated psychiatric facilities and is designed to familiarize the student with the diagnosis and treatment of patients who have been referred for psychiatric care. Students are afforded the opportunity to observe physicians as they provide psychiatric care, and are typically involved in direct patient care as a physician-supervised member of the multi-disciplinary team. Students frequently participate in activities such as rounds, group therapy, physical diagnosis and case management. Students often have the opportunity to participate in a variety of additional learning experiences such as lectures, team conferences and individual supervision.

Electives/Primary Care Electives
To be chosen at the student’s discretion pending approval by the Office of Clinical Education.