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Mary Bea Drummond | 918-594-8223

Contact:

Sean Kennedy | 918-594-8360


Seminar: neuroimaging studies of reward processing in major depressive disorder

TULSA, Okla. – Wayne C. Drevets, M.D., director and president of the Laureate Institute for Brain Research in Tulsa, is guest speaker at First Friday seminar at noon Friday, April 1, at Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences.

His topic explores how a deficit in central reward processing is thought to underlie the diminished ability of individuals with major depressive disorder to derive pleasure from activities once deemed enjoyable. Drevets also is Oxley Professor of Neuroscience Research at the Oklahoma University College of Medicine.

The seminar is at noon in room D-107 of the Center for Advanced Medical Education on the OSU-CHS campus, 17th Street and Southwest Boulevard in Tulsa. The public is invited. Refreshments will be available at 11:45 a.m.

More about the topic:
Neuroimaging studies of reward processing in major depressive disorder
A deficit in central reward processing is thought to underlie the diminished ability of individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) to derive pleasure from activities once deemed enjoyable. Notably, the corticolimbic networks shown to mediate and modulate the neural processing of reward and behavioral incentive in studies of experimental animals also have been implicated in the pathophysiology of MDD by data from neuroimaging and neuropathological studies. These networks involve the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), amygdala, hippocampus and anatomically related areas of the striatum where reductions in grey matter volume and alterations in neurophysiological activity exist in some MDD subgroups. Using PET and fMRI imaging my colleagues and I investigated patterns of neural activity and dynamic neurotransmitter function within these circuits in depressed subjects as they performed reward processing tasks. While performing a monetary incentive delay (MID) task, depressed MDD subjects showed altered hemodynamic activity in the OFC, hippocampus, amygdala and accumbens, as they anticipated initiating behavioral responses aimed at acquiring rewards or avoiding losses. These physiological abnormalities were associated with impaired modulation of the behavioral response to changing incentive levels. Currently remitted subjects with MDD showed an abnormal diathesis to develop both this same behavioral pattern on the MID task and abnormal glucose metabolism in the OFC and accumbens area under catecholamine depletion. Converging with these data, depressed patients also showed abnormally reduced dopamine release during reward processing and reduced dopamine D1 receptor binding in the anteroventral striatum. The results of these studies will be integrated with relevant neurobiological data from preclinical studies into circuitry-based models that may elucidate the neural basis of the anhedonia, amotivation and mood-congruent processing biases manifest clinically in MDD.

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Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences in Tulsa offers programs in osteopathic medicine, biomedical sciences and forensic sciences. Since its beginnings more than 30 years ago, OSU-CHS has grown to offer eight graduate degrees. On-campus programs, distance learning and OSU partnerships train osteopathic physicians, research scientists and health care professionals with an emphasis on serving rural and under-served Oklahoma. OSU operates eight clinics, six in Tulsa, one in Enid and one in Muskogee. More information about OSU Center for Health Sciences is available at www.healthsciences.okstate.edu.

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