Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences
Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences

OSU-CHS News > 2014

Nov. 25, 2014

Braman American Legion supports OSU-CHS traumatic brain injury research

Johnny Stephens, OSU-CHS interim vice president for research and chief operating officer, left, accepts the donation from Rusty Partee, Tim Smith, American Legion Department of Oklahoma commander, Randy McRae, Marv Sandbek, American Legion Department of Oklahoma historian, Gary Brech and Scott Tafoya, American Legion Department of Oklahoma service officer.
Johnny Stephens, Pharm.D., OSU-CHS interim vice president for research and chief operating officer, left, accepts the donation from Rusty Partee, Tim Smith, American Legion Department of Oklahoma commander, Randy McRae, Marv Sandbek, American Legion Department of Oklahoma historian, Gary Brech and Scott Tafoya, American Legion Department of Oklahoma service officer.

The American Legion Hennessey Cunningham Post 259 from Braman donated funds from their annual poppy sales on Monday to support the OSU-CAHM’s research on hyperbaric oxygen therapy treatment for veterans with traumatic brain injuries.

The donation came from the proceeds of the post’s annual poppy sales campaign, a nationwide American Legion program. During World War I, the poppy flower, which adorned the battlefields of Flanders Field, became a symbol of those who had fought and died during the war. The American Legion Auxiliary Poppy Program began in 1921 to support and raise awareness for veterans.

American Legion Post 259 was represented by Marv Sandbek, American Legion Department of Oklahoma historian, Rusty Partee, Gary Brech, Randy McRae and Randy Teeters, post commander. American Legion Department of Oklahoma Commander Tim Smith and Department Service Officer Scott Tafoya also participated in the presentation.

More than 17,000 diagnosed Oklahoma service members have been diagnosed with mild to moderate traumatic brain injuries, according to Oklahoma Department of Veterans Affairs. TBIs affect a person’s ability to think, concentrate, sleep and interact with others.

OSU-CHS recently completed participation in a national study on the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of traumatic brain injuries. Early results suggest hyperbaric oxygen therapy may have positive effects on persistent TBI symptoms.


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