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THURSDAY, Feb. 9, 2012

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma partners with OSU Center for Health Sciences on Healthy Women, Healthy Futures program
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Dr. Kayse Shrum, OSU-CHS provost, Bert Marshall, president of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma, Howard Barnett, president of OSU-Tulsa and OSU-CHS, and John Dodd, CAP director of education leadership honor BCBS of Oklahoma’s grant to the Healthy Women, Healthy Futures program at a reception on Feb. 7.

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma announced a $300,000 contribution to Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences to provide health education and physician services for Healthy Women, Healthy Futures, a program to assist at-risk women living in poverty with children enrolled at one of three Community Action Project early childhood centers.
 
“One of our top missions at the OSU-CHS College of Osteopathic Medicine is to provide health care for underserved populations,” said Howard Barnett, president of OSU-Tulsa and OSU-CHS. “Healthy Women, Healthy Futures allows us to reach out and provide medical services to an underserved population in Tulsa with educational programs that aim to improve physical, emotional, social, dental and vision health.”
 
Healthy Women, Healthy Futures seeks to improve the health of at-risk women before they become pregnant again, minimizing the risk of premature birth or infant death. In addition to Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma and OSU Center for Health Sciences, the program is a community partnership between CAP, the University of Oklahoma College of Nursing, Tulsa Health Department, Community Health Connection, Eye Care for Tulsa and Ocean Dental. Classes address the benefits of exercise, cardiovascular wellness, diabetes prevention, nutrition, healthy shopping and cooking and pregnancy plan development.
 
“Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma’s contribution to Healthy Women, Healthy Futures is an extension of the company’s initiative that focuses on engaging children and their families in understanding the importance of healthy lifestyles and preventing and managing disease,” said Bert Marshall, president of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma. “Our goal is to help families, especially women, think about health as a priority and how it can impact their way of life and their children.”
 
Healthy Women, Healthy Futures focuses on women who have previously delivered a child and are likely to become pregnant again but are not currently insured. Since the Tulsa program was originally launched in 2008 with funding from the George Kaiser Family Foundation, more than 100 participants have been served.
 
In response to the contribution from Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma, the George Kaiser Family Foundation has pledged a matching gift of $300,000, providing a total of $600,000 for the program. Funds from the grants will be used to support the costs of nutritional classes, medical services, health navigators and nurse educators for the program. The program is operated by the University of Oklahoma College of Nursing.
 
Overall 63 percent of participants reported improved lifestyles through Healthy Women, Healthy Futures. These changes include eating healthier, getting more exercise, improved stress reduction, getting a job, going to school or work, improved self-esteem and getting a driver’s license.
 
For more information about the Healthy Women, Healthy Futures program, visit www.captc.org/iLab/HWHF.php.

Learn more about CAHM research at OSU-CHS

For more information about the Healthy Women, Healthy Futures program, visit www.captc.org/iLab/HWHF.php.

 An OSU-CHS Center for Aerospace and Hyperbaric Medicine study on altitude and passenger comfort used in the development of Boeing’s new 787 Dreamliner explored ways to offer travelers a more comfortable flight experience.


IN THE NEWS

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Medical student Jaye Bea Downs talks about OSU students at OkMOM.

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OSU medical students assist at Mission of Mercy dental clinic.

Tulsa World
OSU COM students volunteer at OkMOM.

Osteopathic Founders Foundation Winterset  Ball is Feb. 25.

KRMG
Dr. Wymore discusses CDC study of Morgellons disease.


Mark your calendar

OSU OB/GYN at women’s expo
Look for OSU Physicians Obstetrics and Gynecology at the OSU Health Pavilion during the 2012 Tulsa Women’s Living Expo Friday through Sunday at Expo Square. Expo hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday.

Faculty development
Dr. John Pelley presents “The Neurobiology of Learning” and “Making TBL Work,” from 1-5 p.m. Feb. 17, in Dunlap Auditorium. If you plan to attend, RSVP to Machelle Linsenmeyer by 5 p.m. Wednesday.

Fundraiser canceled
Applebee’s Flapjack Fund-raiser on Feb. 18 has been canceled. If you purchased a ticket, you can return it to the seller for a full refund.

OSU Energy Education

Help save energy by matching light bulb wattage to lighting needs indoors and outdoors.

For example, a high wattage reading light in a hallway or alcove is not energy efficient. Fixtures that cast light downward help reduce the effects of light pollution and provide more light where you want it. Be mindful of the impact outdoor lighting can have on your neighbors and the environment. 


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